The Crozier Reaches the Finish Line: A Look Inside

The Crozier, Corner of Central and Willow, Knoxville, December 2018

It was November 2015 when I first reported that a building on the corner of Willow and Central would be demolished for a much larger (and nicer) building which would host both commercial and residential space. By October 2016, challenges had been encountered on the site and the building had been redesigned to be taller. It’s been a journey.

The Crozier, Corner of Central and Willow, Knoxville, December 2018

The Crozier, Corner of Central and Willow, Knoxville, December 2018

I met with Daniel Smith last week to walk through the new building, which is still in the process of finishes to see what the response has been and where the development stands. We entered through the commercial space, which faces both Willow and Jackson, on the ground floor.

Corner Commercial Space, The Crozier, Corner of Central and Willow, Knoxville, December 2018

Basement Commerical Space, The Crozier, Corner of Central and Willow, Knoxville, December 2018

There will be two businesses on the ground floor of the building. Neither have been officially announced, but one will have a large corner space with exposure to both streets. The other will have, perhaps, the most interesting footprint of any business on the city, with entrances on both Willow and Jackson in a space shaped like an L and wrapping around the other business.

Penthouse, The Crozier, Corner of Cenral and Willow, Knoxville, December 2018

Penthouse Deck, The Crozier, Corner of Central and Willow, Knoxville, December 2018

Penthouse View, The Crozier, Corner of Central and Willow, Knoxville, December 2018

As a result of geological realities, the original building plans were changed to include a basement. Once that decision was made, the developers were able to increase the height of the building as they’d already had to assume the cost of a deeper foundation. The result is two sections in the basement. One will be devoted to storage for residents and the other is currently planned for office space, though that use is still fluid.

The Crozier, Corner of Central and Willow, Knoxville, December 2018

The Crozier, Corner of Central and Willow, Knoxville, December 2018

The Crozier, Corner of Central and Willow, Knoxville, December 2018

The Crozier, Corner of Central and Willow, Knoxville, December 2018

The Crozier, Corner of Central and Willow, Knoxville, December 2018

Of the residential units, there are a total of nineteen ranging from one bedroom to a single three-bedroom unit. Sixteen of the homes are under contract and owners have begun moving in their belongings. Buyers have represented a range, from people who are moving locally to some from outside Knoxville. Some owners purchased their unit for a second home and some purchased to rent until they can retire to Knoxville in the coming years.

The Crozier, Corner of Central and Willow, Knoxville, December 2018

The Crozier, Corner of Central and Willow, Knoxville, December 2018

The Crozier, Corner of Central and Willow, Knoxville, December 2018

The Crozier, Corner of Central and Willow, Knoxville, December 2018

The units were sold from the top down and we started our tour in the penthouse. Some of the owners have waited for as much as a year to take possession. Larger than the other units, it features upgraded finishes and a wrap-around balcony. I didn’t shoot much inside because work was continuing, but the views from the balcony are enough to sell it.

The Crozier, Corner of Central and Willow, Knoxville, December 2018

The Crozier, Corner of Central and Willow, Knoxville, December 2018

The Crozier, Corner of Central and Willow, Knoxville, December 2018

The Crozier, Corner of Central and Willow, Knoxville, December 2018

There are four units on the top floor and five on each of the three floors below it. Some homeowners, including those on the top floor, have made substantial upgrades to their homes, meaning the sales price will not reflect what the homes will be worth on resale. The one-bedroom condos each have small balconies.

One of the units available, 201, features a second-floor view of Central Street that I loved, and at just over 1300 square feet, it felt spacious. The realtor representing the development is Kimberly Dixon Hamilton at Downtown Realty, Inc. If you are interested in learning more about one of the remaining units, you may contact her by clicking the ad at the top of this page or by calling 865-588-5535.

Future Home of Stockyard Lofts, Willow Avenue, Knoxville, December 2018

One final note: I couldn’t resist the chance to ask about Stockyard Lofts which is scheduled to be constructed adjacent to the Crozier and shares some of the same developers. The current schedule calls for breaking ground February 1 with a projected completion timeline of nineteen months, meaning the apartments would be ready for occupancy in the fall of 2020.

Comments

  1. The master bath is amazing! I could spend all day in that shower.

  2. Residents will have the option of parking in the Stockyard Lofts garage, when that building is complete. In the meantime, the public lot next door is available for monthly rental.

  3. Christopher King says

    The design is fine- it fits in relatively well with its context and brings energy to the neighborhood that Big Don’s never did (though good cities need weird as well as the slick profitable stuff). I do think the extra floor was unfortunate. The original height worked better.

    My main gripe is nit-picky…The sidewalk on the corner had huge granite curbs that I always admired as I walked by. They had been there for over a hundred years, now we have concrete curb that will last maybe twenty years. How can this happen in a historic district?! Historic elements of streetscapes need to protected just as much as the buildings!

    • KnoxvilleUrbanGuy says

      I agree about the curbs but, to be clear in the conversation, that was a decision by the City of Knoxville.

  4. It’s nice to see the area pick up! It’s better for everyone.
    Great views from the penthouse deck!

  5. KnoxvilleUrbanGuy says

    Are we all clear as to what was in this spot before? Follow the first link in the article and look at the two buildings. Then look at the new one. Repeat as needed.

  6. The brick exterior is far better looking than the cheapo stucco that many developers default to these days.

  7. I think it looks awesome. They covered up the ninja turtle but I’m finally starting to get over it. And yes you shouldnt live in the city if your worried about walking a little. It’s one of the great things for most people who live in the city.

  8. I’m happy to see this finished finished project and am glad to learn that most of the units have sold. I wish that we could build more old buildings, but I think that this new building blends well with the surrounding Old City. I believe that the residents who will fill this building will help support continued growth downtown, and, importantly, continued preservation and use of the neighboring historic buildings in the Old City that we all love.

  9. Produce store across from the new butcher?

  10. Very nice looking units. The kitchens appear to have a little higher quality than what you typically find in urban living, which is nice to see. The views from the penthouse deck are absolutely gorgeous. You’ll always find detractors in any project of this caliber and importance, but I am happy this design wound up getting delivered to completion and didn’t become a big empty hole in the ground after all the soil and structural issues that came up. Can’t wait for the new retail tenants and the Stockyard Apartments!

  11. I feel like you’d really appreciate the architecture on this building if you appreciate the high brow architecture of any local Hampton Inn. Enjoying paying the mortgage on that unit.

  12. Kathy Slocum says

    I’m very disappointed in exterior design of this building. It takes away from the “feel” of the Old City. The architectural possibilities that corner presented were not met, and then they made it taller and more intrusive.

  13. Where are the residents going to park?

    • There’s a giant free parking lot 1/2 block away

    • John in Knoxville says

      Why do people keep asking this question?

      • Because they live out West and, out there, if you have to walk more than 30 feet it’s a “huge hassle” and completely impossible to deal with.

        • Maybe they meant like “is there a secured/well lit lot/area for tenants to park” aka is there any deeded parking that comes with the unit? You’d hope for what folks are paying for these units, there is some type of secured parking. After having your car broken into 2-3 times in the non secured “free lot” by the bums hanging around outside, it does turn into a huge “hassle”.

        • I’ve lived downtown for almost 10 years. I’ve had my car broken into and vandalized 4 times, all times were when I was parked in a public lot I was leasing a spot in. The only “secure” parking for those is us living downtown, is leasing a spot in a secure garage, which took about a year of waiting for me to get. Cars are vandalized all the time downtown, especially on the weekends and during UT football season.

          • KnoxvilleUrbanGuy says

            I’m going to counter that a little. I completely accept what you have experienced as accurate, but while I’ve known people who have their cars broken into and vandalized, it has been unusual outside of the Old City. Our experience is that we’ve parked downtown for just shy of a decade. We had two cars for the first four years, so we have 14 car-years parking downtown, most of that being in the Locust Street Garage. Our stats are 14 years of parking downtown = zero vandalism or break-ins. Not saying your experience isn’t valid, but that is my experience. So I do think the last sentence is misleading for someone who doesn’t know downtown Knoxville. Parking downtown isn’t a lock on getting your car vandalized. Mine may be damaged tonight, but my experience suggests it is very safe.

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