“The Revival” Offered for Lease at 825 Locust Street

Medical Arts Building, Knoxville, December 2014

Medical Arts Building, Knoxville, December 2014

The Revival” has opened at 825 Locust Street, Suite 103. The residential unit is available for short-term lease as an event space or for single or multi-night stays ($500 a day, $600 a day with a two day minimum for football weekends). At 2300 square feet and open in design, it’s perfectly set up for a weekend getaway or a fun night in the city for a reception or party. In just a few days on the market, it’s already leased for multiple weekends and has been used for a birthday party, a reception and a sweet sixteen party.

There was some chatter recently on Facebook about the fact that the space, which is a street-level unit, has been made into a residence. Urban design would suggest this is not the best use of a space facing the sidewalk. It’s in the Medical Arts Building, which was successfully transformed from offices to 49 apartments in 2014. I took you inside for a look before the transformation and after the apartments were completed. The commercial use, like most issues discussed on Facebook, is a bit more complicated than one might assume.

The Revival, 825 Locust Street Suite 103, Knoxville, August 2016

The Revival, 825 Locust Street Suite 103, Knoxville, August 2016

The Revival, 825 Locust Street Suite 103, Knoxville, August 2016

The Revival, 825 Locust Street Suite 103, Knoxville, August 2016

The Revival, 825 Locust Street Suite 103, Knoxville, August 2016

The Revival, 825 Locust Street Suite 103, Knoxville, August 2016

Three commercial units were included in the original plan with two opening onto Main Street on one opening onto Locust. Flow: A Brew Parlor opened in the prime corner space (suite 102) in December of 2014. In January of 2015, Waldorf Photography opened in suite 101 on Main Street, where it continues to maintain its business. After nearly a year-and-a-half in business, Flow: A Brew Parlor closed in May of this year. That prime space remains available (Call Jay Cobble at 865-207-9711).

For two years, no one leased suite 103 for retail. Previously the home of a series of restaurants, it would be difficult to use for that purpose today due to grease interceptor requirements and its isolation from other retail. Its location would require just the right kind of business and no one stepped up to propose one and sign a lease. Given that, the Grace brothers, who own the building, decided to build it out as a residential unit, but rather than have a long-term tenant, enlisted Tom Hensley who co-owns and successfully operates Cook Loft and now “221” at 221 Cumberland (in the same building as Cook Loft), to manage “The Revival.”

The Revival, 825 Locust Street Suite 103, Knoxville, August 2016

The Revival, 825 Locust Street Suite 103, Knoxville, August 2016

The Revival, 825 Locust Street Suite 103, Knoxville, August 2016

The Revival, 825 Locust Street Suite 103, Knoxville, August 2016

The Revival, 825 Locust Street Suite 103, Knoxville, August 2016

The Revival, 825 Locust Street Suite 103, Knoxville, August 2016

The Revival, 825 Locust Street Suite 103, Knoxville, August 2016

The Revival, 825 Locust Street Suite 103, Knoxville, August 2016

Features of “The Revival,” listed on the VRBO site include, “a chefs kitchen with a 32 square foot island, double sinks, 72” refrigerator/freezer, double ovens, 36” stove top cooker with stainless steel hood, fully stocked with plates, silver ware, beer, wine, champagne glasses, coffee mugs, coffee maker, toaster, blender.” And that’s just the kitchen.

Three beds are cleverly built into the space unobtrusively, including “1 King Murphy bed, 1 Full Murphy bed (and) 1 Queen sofa sleeper. Two 65 inch televisions have been placed in the unit allowing for business meetings or game viewing. 11 foot windows provide ample light – but they also have privacy blinds. The 1 1/2 bath-unit includes a, “master bath with white marble double vanity sinks, large walk in shower with a 14” rain head.”

The Revival, 825 Locust Street Suite 103, Knoxville, August 2016

The Revival, 825 Locust Street Suite 103, Knoxville, August 2016

The Revival, 825 Locust Street Suite 103, Knoxville, August 2016

The Revival, 825 Locust Street Suite 103, Knoxville, August 2016

Maybe we’ll eventually get to the point that retail space is in enough demand in all parts of downtown Knoxville that this space and other residential street-level spaces will transform due to market demand. At this point, it really is a beautiful space offering a concept that is in remarkably low supply in downtown Knoxville. You are invited to an open house this Friday (First Friday) from 5:00 PM – 9:00 PM to check it out for yourself. If you are interested in leasing the space, you may contact Tom at (865) 310-2216 or thomas@cookloft.com. Contact may also be made through the VRBO site.

Comments

  1. Where was that discussed on Facebook? Curious about the conversation on that.

    • KnoxvilleUrbanGuy says

      Like so many things I run across on FB, I don’t remember where. Someone criticized that they were building residential and it went from there. Why?

  2. Alan, perhaps one reason for this concept being “in remarkably short supply” in Knoxville is that it’s highly controversial, in several varied respects. Not having Facebook, I don’t know how many of my thoughts have been expressed on there. STR’s are rapidly becoming a big problem in Nashville….check the Tennessean for extensive coverage, as recently as Sunday. I also know of a small coastal island community (pop: 5,400) in my home area of New England now wrestling with regulating this, so it’s not just a city situation. The Osbournes visit Mayberry, there.

    It’s not just the NIMBY aspect, although that can potentially count in the mix, depending on the weekend, frankly. Dialogue over city/state regulations, taxing rents and the broader issue of using (or, building) properties as STR’s, vs helping alleviate a housing crunch, figure into the equation, too.

    As Knoxville’s DT continues its growth, this state of affairs will certainly be interesting to watch.

    • My issue is plain and simple: they are running de facto hotels and are not subject to any of the same regulations or taxes. It’s unfair to other hotels and its unfair to residents. It artificially drives up costs and provides little to no long-term benefit to the community at large.

  3. Ben Winder says

    Maplehurst Inn’s property has recently sold, and the Bed & Breakfast business appears to be closed. The market for short term rentals seems different from the market for B&B’s. However, it makes sense there would be some market for non-hotel options for overnight visitors in downtown Knoxville.

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